Thrift Treasure: Prolix Word Game

Thrift Treasure: Prolix Word Game

It’s fun when we find more modern board games at thrift. Anything by Z-Man Games, Rio Grande Games or even Mayfair Games are likely to appear on the shelves since the companies behind them have been around so long. What’s even more fun is when the game is created by a designer we’re familiar with. Such is the case with this week’s Thrift Treasure!

Prolix by Z-Man Games, released in 2010, was designed by Gil Hova. We’ve featured The Networks by his new company, Formal Ferret Games, and selected their latest release, Wordsy, for inclusion into 2017’s holiday gift guide! As it turns out, Prolix was Gil’s very first published game (according to BoardGameGeek) and appears to have set the stage for the creation of Formal Ferret and their entry into the market as a known publisher! And we found our copy for only $2.88!

We've covered games by Gil Hova before, but we found his very first published title at thrift! Check out what we thought of Z-Man Games' Prolix! - SahmReviews.com

Prolix is part word game, part speed game. Like most other games of this genre it requires you to come up with a word using the letters on the board. Unlike the others, every letter in your word need not be in play. In fact, the letter tiles included with Prolix do not display an vowels at all. And the values of the letters change as they move position across the board!

We've covered games by Gil Hova before, but we found his very first published title at thrift! Check out what we thought of Z-Man Games' Prolix! - SahmReviews.com

Prolix is played over 5-6 rounds, depending upon the number of players. The included board is seeded with eight random letter tiles and the active player tries to use as many of them to create one word. As I previously mentioned, just because a letter doesn’t appear on the board doesn’t mean you can’t include it in your word – you just won’t receive any points for it. In this photo example, one might call out “SMILES” or “FACEPLANTED”.

We've covered games by Gil Hova before, but we found his very first published title at thrift! Check out what we thought of Z-Man Games' Prolix! - SahmReviews.com

You then receive points for each letter used in your word that is on the board, taking into account the point value at the bottom and flipping them over to keep track. Some letter tiles (like “Q” or “X”) will have a +1 or +2 bonus to reward you for their difficulty. After you score your world, the two rightmost letters are removed, the remaining six tiles are slid to the right and two new letter tiles are placed. It is then the next person’s turn to find a word.

We've covered games by Gil Hova before, but we found his very first published title at thrift! Check out what we thought of Z-Man Games' Prolix! - SahmReviews.com

Mixing things up and keeping the game moving, if you are not the active player, but see a very strong word that will score lots of points, you may interrupt the active player and call out a word. When you do so, you will score that word, less two points, and put it on your score sheet in the interrupt section. At the end of the game, interrupt words replace the lowest-scoring regular word. But be careful – they replace them even if they are worth less! So you’ll only want to interrupt when you’re positive you’ll score big!

We've covered games by Gil Hova before, but we found his very first published title at thrift! Check out what we thought of Z-Man Games' Prolix! - SahmReviews.com

After interruption, the original active player gets another turn. If that person is interrupted twice during the same turn, they score zero (we elected to remove this rule when playing with opponents of widely different ages). Zero is fine as long as you have an interrupt to replace it, so don’t worry about that low score. In addition, if a player is taking too long to come up with a word, another person can flip the included timer, giving them 45 seconds to submit an answer! (We didn’t use this rule either.)

We've covered games by Gil Hova before, but we found his very first published title at thrift! Check out what we thought of Z-Man Games' Prolix! - SahmReviews.com

Additional rules dictate what words are valid (no proper names, hyphenations, etc.) and you cannot repeats words by just making them plural, past tense or adding a suffix like “ing” or “ly”. All words must be unique and agreed upon by the other players or you’ll have to come up with another. After 5 or 6 rounds of play, scores are tallied and the person with the highest total wins Prolix!

Designed for 1-5 players, Prolix is probably best played by participants with equal vocabulary skills or you’ll find yourself omitting rules like we did. Expect a full game to last under 45 minutes and copies can still be found brand new on Amazon for around $18. Be sure to check out Gil’s most popular game, The Networks, especially if you’re a fan of games with a little more meat to them!

How do you think you’d do at a word game where you could add any letters?

Scott

About Scott

A former manufacturing executive, Scott now balances his family life with ownership and backend administration of websites such as SahmReviews.com, GiftCardCollector.com and a number of other online properties. He also is an occasional writer and full-time board game fanatic.

5 comments on «Thrift Treasure: Prolix Word Game»

  1. Gil Hova says:

    Oh my gosh, my first published game! I have to say that I think Wordsy is immeasurably better than Prolix. I learned a lot about game design between those two games, and I think Wordsy represents what I wanted to do with Prolix – simpler rules, quicker gameplay, and just cuts to the chase.

    I’m grateful to Prolix for teaching me a lot about how to make a game, though! It was a valuable experience for me, and I’m grateful people still recall it fondly.

    1. Scott says:

      We could definitely see the similarities and did appreciate the quicker game play. Word games can be so challenging to create something that hasn’t already been done in the market – Prolix certainly succeeded there!

  2. Rachel says:

    This looks like a really good game! Good to get the brain going!

  3. OH how awesome is this?? I love playing new board games. I definitely have to try this one out! Thanks so much!

  4. Word games are at the top of our list when it comes to family game night. We’ve never heard of or played this one before!

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